Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Tips, Rips, and Reviews by Michael Dalton Johnson

There is a proven relationship between vocabulary and income. Most successful people have good vocabularies and can express their ideas clearly. Less successful people tend to rely on a limited vocabulary augmented with clich├ęs to get their ideas across. You are taken far more seriously when you can express yourself articulately. Clear and precise language gains you respect and credibility.

Don’t bother to learn words that are never used in everyday conversation. The fact that you know the meaning of popinjay is not of any value. However, learning one new word a day is money in the bank.



I had to smile when I read the creative imagery of a restaurant menu that offered, not simply "bacon and eggs" but, "Two farm fresh eggs with country bacon." One description sounds a lot more wholesome and appetizing than the other.


Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. - Oscar Wilde


The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. - Lao Tzu

Brian Tracy is offering a FREE report on beginning your journey to reach your goals. Take that first step and download your copy here. Did I mention it's FREE?


Nate Vitale, sales expert, first coined the phrase, “Money loves speed.” I think this phrase could be restated as, “Money loves action,” and the faster the action, the deeper the love. Those decisive thinkers who seize opportunities when they present themselves gain more than plodding decision makers. This basic advice is worth heeding.


Your comments on Tips, Rips, and Reviews are welcomed. E-mail me here.

Take a look at my book Rules of the Hunt. Available at Amazon.


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Thursday, January 19, 2017

Popcorn in the Park by Michael Dalton Johnson

I have a friend who, after working for 20 years in advertising, risked a good deal of his money and went into business for himself. His boutique ad agency was open for several months, but he had not landed a single client. He was working hard: each day he devoted hours to nonstop calling and mailing potential clients. His stress was turning to desperation, and he was a few weeks away from closing his business.

One day, instead of going to work, he stopped at a store and bought a large bag of popcorn. He drove to a park and spent the entire day feeding pigeons, quietly sitting in the sun and watching kids play. He bought a hotdog and lemonade for lunch.

When he got home, his wife asked, "How was your day?" He smiled and said, "Great."

The next day he returned to work to find two inquiries about his services waiting for him. Within a week, both companies were signed. He went on to build a successful business.

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Monday, November 28, 2016

Communicating a Price Increase by Mark Hunter

No one wants to be the bearer of bad news. So how do you tell your customers that prices are going up?

Even the most sales savvy among us have had to fight back the nerves that arise when we're about to tell a customer about a price increase. It never makes for an easy conversation. When relaying a price increase in a business-to-business environment, remember that your customers have probably had the same discussion with their own customers. A company exists only as long as it earns a profit and it can only do that if it delivers a quality product or service at the right price. The key to any conversation about raising prices is emphasizing that the increase will ensure product quality.

To prepare your strategy for announcing a price increase, ask yourself the following questions:

1. Does the customer take your product/service and add a standard percentage increase in price when selling to their customers?

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Thursday, November 3, 2016

Send Me a Proposal By Chris Lytle

Wow, they must be serious -- they want to see a proposal. You'll think differently after you check out this advice.

Here are four words you really don't want to hear: "Send me a proposal."

If you have made a good presentation and the prospect has a problem you can solve, then you want the prospect to write you a check. That would be a better outcome than going back to your desk and writing a proposal, wouldn't it?

Too many salespeople stop selling as soon as a prospect says, "Send me a proposal." They take it is a buying signal and believe they have had a "great call." Whenever a salesperson tells me, it was a "great call," I know instantly that he didn't get an order.

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Thursday, October 27, 2016

Building Client Loyalty By Tom Hopkins

The average business loses 15% of their clients on an annual basis. It’s safe to assume that some clients move away or sadly, pass away. If you sell to businesses, some of them may close. But, many simply stop using your services or shopping with you. That’s because you haven’t established sound relationships with them. The clients feel no loyalty…no obligation to return.

With the cost of gaining new business five times that of keeping current clients, it’s wise to do all you can to keep those people coming back for more. In order to thrive in business, it’s important to make each client feel important. If they have a negative feeling or are even indifferent to your business, they won’t feel obligated to continue to do business with you.

You start by being grateful for their business. Make good eye contact with clients and say the words, "Thank you for your business," at least once during every contact.

Variations might include...

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Thursday, August 13, 2015

Just Out: Laugh All the Way to the Bank

Laugh All the Way to the Bank



In this week's Coffee With the Dog newsletter, Michelle Nichols explains how to use humor to make the perfect sale.


In the sales world, one of the most common stumbling blocks is price objection. A potential deal may be moving ahead smoothly until numbers enter the conversation, when eager customers suddenly turn and flee. But I’ve found that humor can be an effective tool for moving the sale along at almost every stage of the process. Using humor doesn’t mean going overboard and acting like a goofball. Adding appropriate levity to a situation can increase your likeableness, and help establish that critical connection with customers. As a result, customers will listen more closely, and if trouble erupts, they’re more likely to cut you some slack.


To read the rest of Nichol's article, click here.

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Give us your thoughts on the article in the comments below! 

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Just Out: Lost In Translation

Lost In Translation



In this week's Coffee With the Dog newsletter, the President of Robertson Training Group, Kelley Robertson, explains sales jargon and why you should keep it simple.


Too often sales people use jargon, technical terms, acronyms, and other language that sounds foreign to their prospect or customer.

When I worked in consumer electronics, sales people constantly referred to product numbers when talking to customers. Because they worked with the products every day, they were familiar with the SKU numbers but their customers were not.


To read the rest of Robertson's article, click here.

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Give us your thoughts on the article in the comments below!